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Nutrition and Health Claims

Nutrition and Health Claims

Nutrition claims provide a snapshot about the amount of one specific nutrient in a food, such as fibre or fat. While nutrition claims are optional, they must meet government regulations before appearing on a package.
Health claims must be supported by credible scientific evidence regarding a relationship between a substance (specific food or food component) and a disease or health-related condition.

Common Examples of Nutrition Claims:

    • Source of Fibre
      “Source of fibre??? means the food contains at least 2 grams of fibre in the amount of food specified in the Nutrition Facts table.
      “High source of fibre” means the food contains at least 4 grams of fibre.
      “Very high source of fibre” means the food contains at least 6 grams of fibre.
    • Low Fat
      “Low fat” means that the food contains no more than 3 grams of total fat in the amount specified.

Nutrition and Health Claims

    • Low in Saturated Fat
      This claim “low in saturated fat??? means there is no more than 2 grams or 15% of energy from saturated and trans fatty acids combined in the amount of food specified in the Nutrition Facts table.
    • Trans Fat Free
      “Trans fat free??? means that the food contains no more than 0.2 grams of trans fat in the amount specified. The food must also meet the conditions set out for “low in saturated fat???.
    • Cholesterol-free
      The claim “cholesterol-free” means the food contains less than 2 mg of cholesterol in the amount of food specified in the nutrition facts table and it is also low in saturated and trans fat.

Nutrition and Health Claims

    • Sodium-free
      A “sodium-free” claim means the product contains less than 5 mg of sodium for the amount of food specified in the nutrition facts table.
    • Reduced in Calories
      “Reduced in Calories” has at least 25% less energy compared to the original food product provided that the reference food is not “low in energy???, which is when the product has less than 40 Calories per reference amount.
    • Light
      The term “light” is allowed only on foods that are either “reduced in fat” or “reduced in energy” (Calories) or “Light” can also be used to describe sensory characteristics of a food, for example light tasting or light coloured.

Examples of Health Claims:

      • A healthy diet rich in a variety of vegetables and fruit may help reduce the risk of some types of cancer.
      • A healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Ref: 2003 Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising.